Asthma Chemicals

Symptoms of Chemical Induced Asthma

Chemicals that are inhaled can cause a variety of symptoms. Symptoms may include: wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and trouble sleeping. You will notice that symptoms get worse after exposure to chemicals.

Causes of Chemical Induced Asthma

Many household cleaners, soaps, and grooming supplies contain chemicals that can trigger asthma symptoms. Natural fragrances that are found in air fresheners or cleaners may also be the cause of a reaction. When purchasing cleaners and air fresheners for your home, check the label and choose products that do not contain fragrant, irritants, VOCs, or flammable ingredients. Chemicals may also be found in the workplace, especially those that clean or does hair full time. It may be harder to avoid chemicals that are found in the workplace, but you will need to take precautionary measures.

Treatment of Chemical Induced Asthma

The first step is to remove the use of chemicals from the home. Even many household cleaners that claim to be clean and healthy may have chemicals that will trigger asthma symptoms. When cleaning, be sure to keep windows open and keep to room well ventilated. There are many natural cleaners such as using water, vinegar, baking soda, etc. instead of using harsh chemicals in your home. If you are not able to cut out chemicals completely because of your job or any other reason, then you will want to be sure to monitor your breathing. You will want to continue taking your prescribed medication and keep your quick-rescue inhaler nearby just in case.

Asthma Chemicals FAQ

What chemicals cause asthma?

There are many chemicals that can cause asthma. The most common are shellac, epoxy resins, foam, rubber, carpet, insulation, lacquer, and dyes.

Are chemicals bad for asthma?

Yes, chemicals can be bad for asthma. If you are around chemicals, it is important to wear the proper protection from the chemicals.

Can chemical smells trigger asthma?

Yes, chemical smells are known to trigger asthma. In some cases, just anticipating the smells can lead to an asthma attack.